The Gift of Experience: Give your time

We talk about this frequently on our Instagram account especially at this time of year when everyone’s “Best Stuff to Get Your Kids” Lists are cropping up. That although giving stuff to kids is fun for the adult, it’s not what they really want or need.

What they really need is your time.

So I thought I’d share one of our own recent experience gifts because it’s not enough to just say it is it? We must practice what we preach.

A day at the local Natural History Museum is one of his favourite outings.

As you can see, there’s a lot to see.

Quentin enjoys the the first floor the most because it focuses on the animals of our region from prehistoric times until now. Museums are the perfect space for children to explore. Lots to see and do and share with an adult.

This is the perfect time for a child to take the lead. When we are on an outing together we always remember to follow the child. Their path through an exhibit may not be the one you would have chosen. We return three times to look into this microscope to look at the small shoreline creatures that inhabit our local fresh water edges.

This takes a lot patience! There’s so much to see and the tendency of the adult is to keep moving to see everything. It’s not the same for the child. They may focus on one area, or they may rush through the entire building at break neck speed. But the success of the outing depends on how much they have enjoyed it. And so we follow the child.

An interesting thing to note is that the financial cost of the experience (in this case a year’s pass to the museum) is actually less expensive than the pile of stuff he could have been given.

If you are considering giving a gift of experience this year but are having trouble narrowing it down or knowing where to start consider this:

  • Follow the child. A trip to the water theme park, art gallery, museum or a walk in the forest are all perfect for different children. Choose an activity your own child would love.
  • Do your research. Places often offer season passes or yearly memberships. These can often be extremely inexpensive for the amount of times you will use it.
  • Think of your own needs. If roller coasters aren’t your thing, you are likely not going to be taking your child to the theme park that often. Even if you did buy the season’s pass.
  • Find something local and awesome. There are so many hidden community gems. Ask friends and family about their favourites.
  • Seek adventure. Sometimes the best experiences are when you travel. Consider taking your child to see something amazing, even if it is only in the next town over.

Looking back over the years it is the times I have spent out and about with my children that are some of my favourite. As the gifts pile up, it’s up to us to think about what we want to pass on to our children.

When they look back on their childhood, what do you want them to remember?l

Sunday Book Club: Autumn favourites 

As October ushers itself in today I thought I would share one of our favourite Autumnal books. 


Goodbye Summer Hello Autumn is the perfect story for a 3-6 child of a girl exploring her neighbourhood, taking in all the sights and sounds of the seasons changing. 

Today we chose to pack it into Quentin’s backpack and head out in search of our own changing seasons. 


All of a sudden we find ourselves back in jeans and layers. Walking through the forest on the way down to the Pacific Ocean, the air was cool and we noticed many of the leaves had already started to fall. 

We love taking books with us outdoors! Such an easy way to expand on the story. 

Happy October everyone!

May Nature Study: Butterflies and other Insects 

The warmer weather has finally arrived and so we spent the majority of our May Nature Study outside. 

Studying insects is one of the easiest topics to do because they are accessible on almost every continent, there is a large variety and children are most often fascinated by them. 


We began our study by exploring different species of butterfly with the help of these beautiful cards from Alice Cantrell of Twig and Moth. We use so many of her materials because they are well priced, printable at home and above all beautiful. 


We enjoyed some old favourites on the topic. This book is fantastic. The art style and amount of information are perfectly paired. 


We also enjoy this book and we recommend all of this series. It is our favourite nature series for the 3-6 age group. 


Lastly we decided to take a field trip to our local butterfly sanctuary. It is so beautiful there with so many different species of butterflies and moths. At just turned 5 Quentin now does really well on learning outings. This will serve him well as he progresses into the Second Plane of Development. 


Montessori asks us to “Follow the Child” and this simply couldn’t be more applicable than when out and about. We travel at his pace, and stop when he wants to. This gives him an opportunity to really take in what he is seeing, to ask questions or to return to something he wants to know more about. 


We both agreed that a butterfly sanctuary is a gorgeous spot to take photos. 
If you have been looking to start a nature study, insects is a great place to start. Books from the library, and simply stepping outside are all you need.  

Sunday Book Club: Best Summer Exploration Books

With Autumn and Back to School looming just around the corner, we are compelled to spend as much time as we can outside. 

I love picture books that ask children to think outside the box. To be open minded, to try something new. All of these books do that. From finding wild in unexpected places, to bears trying new things. From finding an unlikely new friend to looking at the ordinary in an extraordinary way. 

These books invite a child to look at the world with awe and wonder. Two big, important words in the Montessori world. 

As an after note: “Explorers of the Wild” is written in the first person. Think hard about which of the Explorers it is. That is the genius of this book. We are more alike than different. 
Book info:

A Child in the Wild 

We are reviewing a child’s adventure club. I’ll do a full review shortly when we are farther along, but I thought I’d share our travels of today. 

  
A Montessori child in the forest. There really just isn’t anything more awe inspiring. The soft foot falls, the quite concentration as he carefully steps over a mushroom.

  
  
Here, the rainforest meets the Pacific, and fresh water meets salt. Moving at the child’s pace, made us more mindful of our surroundings. 

 

 
Do you use a nature journal with your child? It is an easy and fun way of collecting memories. 

In the end he carried his pack the entire 80 minute round trip. We took our time, talked along the way, and made it all about him. We picnicked on a soft blanket, while the almost deafening crash of the Pacific loomed ever closer. When its reach was only an arms length away, we decided we’d better go.

The final destination was worth just as much as the journey.