The addition of art

Quentin turned 18 Months old this week. I realized that I hadn’t really given him some art trays. So although we have done art together for awhile, I felt it was time to make it accessible to him on his shelves.

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My Mother sent some beautiful hand made orange pumpkin spice play dough. He squished it and poked it and pulled it off his fingers. We have been demonstrating how to role it into a ball. I love home made play dough. Easy to make, chemical free, and you can make any colour or scent you want. I’ve added a shape cutter to the tray, but really it’s all about the sensorial experience.

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A new pasting tray. The little round box hold bits of paper, but really it could be anything. I have plans to add “things” to paste like fabric, buttons and feathers.

We have also had our Stockmar Block Crayons on the shelves forever.

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We’ve also done painting with a brush, but I have to prepare the colours on a plate. I’m hoping that these new activities will be more self directed. I love seeing the joy on his face when he realizes he’s made something.

I’ve been asked for the play dough recipe. A big thanks to my Mother for sending it so quickly.

Ingredients
3 cups flour
1.5 cups salt
6 tsp .cream of tartar
3 tbsp. of oil
3 cups of water

TO MAKE:
Place all of the above ingredients in a pot, and place on stove.
Cook on medium heat until dough begins to form a ball, by coming away from the sides of the pot. Remove from pot and knead until desired consistency.

You can add food colouring and spices while kneading if you wish. Let cool slightly and place in a container with lid. Should last between 2-3 months.

Baking

Do you bake at home? It’s one of my favourite things and yet it was (shamefully) the thing I had not yet given Quentin a real opportunity to do. He would do a small part. Turn on the mixer, get out the bowl, but really he would just work in his kitchen while I did it. Maybe once in a while mix in the flour.

What was stopping me? I don’t know. How complicated it would be. Or the mess factor I guess.

How very UN Montessori.

I took the push I was getting from Deb and Kylie and plunged in…with something very simple.

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At his weaning table, ingredients divided into bowls ahead of time, some of the dry ingredients premixed.

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He started with stirring the oats already in his mixing bowl. I asked him if he wanted to pour. He said yes.

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Then he wanted to stir for a bit. There was a small “sampling”. He didn’t like it.

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He eventually said “Done”, got up and took off his apron. I cleaned up his table, got out his lunch and he ate while I rolled the Cranberry & White Chocolate Cookies into balls and placed them in the oven.

So what did I take away from it all? It wasn’t hard to do. The pre measuring could have happened during a nap or after he went to bed for the next morning, but I did it while he was just in the other room and it didn’t take long. It was good that I had lunch ready to go so he could move onto something and I could finish and clean up. It was also good that it was a simple recipe. No exact measuring, no complicated ingredients.

I also saw the concentration, and delight in Quentin’s eyes throughout the process. He named (repeated the name) of each ingredient as it was added, and he knows that he made something for the family. He contributed to family life which is a big deal in the Montessori world.

The best part was just being able to share something that I love with him.

17 Months Today

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He said “egg”, went into his kitchen, got out his slicer and set to work. I love him, and I love Montessori.

A Saturday at the Market/Toilet Learning next step

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There’s nothing better than taking in a farmers market on a beautiful Saturday morning.
Beautiful wholesome foods, locally farmed. Friendly faces and lots of sensorial experience.

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Quentin is surveying the playground. He is a quiet and reserved child. He will usually observe instead of rushing in.

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In the end he never made it passed the bar.

On a side note, this was the first time Quentin stayed in underwear for an extended journey. I haven’t worked up the courage to keep him in underwear if we’re going more than 15 or so minutes from home. Today we were out for 6 hours. We (I) have to reform my thinking. I have to shake off my embarrassment. So what if he has an accident? This is Quentin’s journey, not mine. I’m just the guide. I have to show I believe in him, not show that I doubt him.

We took him to the bathroom when we got to and left each location today. He went every time. We brought a spare change of clothes including clean underwear (just in case), & left the training diapers at home.

We never needed the change.

Everything I (and maybe you) need to know….Part 2: The first half of The First Plane

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“The greatness of the human personality begins at the hour of birth.” Maria Montessori “The Secret of Childhood”

So what exactly does that mean? Maria Montessori confirmed that children don’t learn the same way, at the same pace their whole life. The First Plane of Development (birth-6) is an amazing surge of growth. Not just physically but mentally as well. This is where children simply seem to “soak up” information about the world around them. Children begin to acquire language, develop cognitive and motor skills, begin to imitate the adults around them, and develop expectations of the world around them. Montessori described this period of learning as the Absorbent Mind.

From a Montessori perspective there are many experiences that a parent can offer, beginning in infancy that will help their child develop a life long love of learning (and I’m definitely not referring to flash cards here). It is also misunderstood that a parent needs to “buy all the expensive gear”.

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The Munari Moblie is the first in a series that can be offered to infants. We didn’t start with this one. We started with the Gobbi. I made it myself easily and cheaply. It was the first time I had made a material and I got hooked. Something beautiful to look at, a wall mirror and a soft blanket to lay on, is all that is needed to begin to build concentration: the foundation of learning.

I could go on forever about all the materials you could make/buy or all the activities you can do with your “under 3”, but that is not what this is about.

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These are what this is about.

These charts taken from “The Absorbent Mind” outline what’s going on at every month between birth and 2 1/2. Knowing that every child’s body and brain go through these same milestones at roughly the same time can help a parent understand the often “strange” behaviour of “under 3’s”. A child has a fundamental need to exert maximum effort (throwing things). A child needs to imitate activities (gets in the way while making dinner).

So. What’s to be done with all this knowledge? Well, if you’re a Montessori family, you provide that prepared environment that allows the child to safely and constructively fulfill that need. This perhaps means looking at your space. Are the materials/toys beautiful, natural and realistic? Are they presented neatly (or spread all over the floor to trip over & curse). Is there time in the day for the child to move their body freely no matter what age they are? Do you slow your pace so the child has a chance to work along side you around the home experiencing all the sensorial world has to offer? Most importantly, do you respect your child as a human being. Capable of understanding real speech (not baby talk). Able to actually do real and meaningful work given the right size tools.

I guess the take away message is that a child starts learning at birth. You don’t need to worry about all “the materials”. If you’re going to worry about anything, worry about the experiences. Provide lots right from birth. Language, Sensorial, Mathematical, Cultural and Practical Life (Montessori language for life skills). These are the 5 that will build a lifetime love and curiosity for all the world has to offer.

Isn’t it funny that these 5 just happen to be the 5 areas of a Montessori classroom.

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Everything I (and maybe you) need to know about Montessori: Part 1

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When you hear the word Montessori what comes to mind? Most would say schools. Those that have little or no idea might say “That’s where the kids get to do whatever they want.” How many would correctly identify it as a pedagogy. A science or way of teaching. This pedagogy just happens to be directed at children, but not just “preschoolers”, and most certainly not just in a classroom.

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Maria Montessori used her medical background to study children of all ages, and walks of life. Over the years of studying how children learn, she set up “Children’s Houses”. A school unlike any other where children would be surrounded with natural, realistic beautiful materials. Montessori discovered that all people, right from birth are naturally curious about their environment.

Once the years of studying children and then designing the materials were complete, the rest flowed naturally. Invite a child (of any age) into a beautiful space (in Montessori language we call that a prepared environment). Give him/her an opportunity to freely move about that environment and choose freely from any prepared material they are intrigued by. Design the materials so that everything is accessible, easily manipulated, and has a built in control of error, so the child learns naturally from their own mistakes. Allow that child to work uninterrupted with that material for as long as they choose. Most importantly provide a Guide (in Montessori language we call her a Directress not a teacher), that will always speak quietly, respectfully and lovingly to the children. A guide that will assist the child in gaining new information, not telling the child what he should learn. A guide that will foster independence, without burdening the child with ego building praise. A guide that will demonstrate Grace and Courtesy (important words in the Montessori world) and Peace so that even the smallest child is able to show compassion. Over 100 years later, in over 100 countries, and 22,000 schools Montessori is changing the face of educating our children.

All this pedagogy or “way of teaching” is not limited to a school setting. That’s why many families all over the globe classify themselves (we are one of them) as Montessorians. We use the same fundamental principles described above in our own lives beginning at the birth of our children. Many would not agree with our practices that may include children self feeding, toilet learning and contributing to household chores at an earlier age than is readily accepted in most cultures. However I think all parents would agree that they love their children. Montessorians look at that love as a gift and a powerful one. Maria Montessori said “Within the child, lies the fate of the future.” I believe that was never more true than it is in todays world.

I will include this link for anyone wanting some ideas of materials. I would also encourage anyone to read Maria Montessori’s books. Especially the “Absorbent Mind”. You can find a link in a previous post. I will continue this series by going into greater detail on the different stages of a child’s development beginning from birth. I hope it will bring better clarity. Both to myself and others.

About Us

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This is Quentin (11 months) and Anthony (12). A big gap, I know. Image

This is where we live: Sooke, B.C Canada.

And what will follow (with any luck) will be the story of us, as we bring Montessori from the school environment into our home.