Montessori 3-6 Botany in the Home 

I have always advocated against the need for the true Montessori didactic materials in a home setting. The reason for this is that there are an endless supply of ways to explore the world with your child in the home environment. And you don’t need any formal training to do it. 

So, having led with that, we don’t have a Botany Leaf Cabinet, or Parts of a Plant cards. We simply go outside and garden. 
 
Gardens are so perfect for children. A feast for the senses at every level, a connection between what is grown and what is consumed by animals, insects and humans. And, most importantly, Practical Life. The ability to plant, care for, and harvest one’s own food. Even the youngest of children can help. 

  

Gardens can come in any shape and size. You can grow vegetables in a field, a large wooden planter box, in a small pot on a balcony or even a windowsill. 

If your thoughts turn to the fact that you do not have a green thumb, don’t worry. 

Your child does. 

  
Try sprinkling lettuce seeds into some soil, cover and leave a small spray bottle near by with a little water. Your child will feel such a sense of accomplishment when the first green stems poke through the soil. 

Summer: An Update 

The other day, we had our first morning where the wind definitely had an Autumn chill. It was light but it was there. And so, with school just over a week away I thought I’d share some of my favourite Summer moments we’ve had. 
 
Creating under the big Maple tree in our front yard. I think of all the mornings we’ve spent there drawing painting and reading will be my favourite memories of this Summer. 
  
Nature Journaling. We pack his bag and go. He collects small samples to bring back for our Nature Tray and records the rest. This has been a good way to channel his writing practice. 

  
Practical Life. It never really stops. He will sit and sew and we’ll talk. Sometimes about everything and sometimes about nothing. 

  Bike riding together. Their bond has strengthened while they’ve been off together. This was Anthony’s Birthday.  

 

And finally, because within every Montessori child lies a teacher, there was work. He would pull something off his shelves, set it up carefully and then call the cat over. 

Here Huxley, see a nineteen is really just a 10 plus a 9. 

His new school bag hangs from his dressing chair and his new school shoes should arrive tomorrow. And we are ready. Ready to get back to it. He asks daily if it’s a school day. It will be good to start the next school year and watch him grow, but it has been a very nice summer. 

Happy Canada Day

While there were many parties and community activities to mark the day, we spent the holiday together as a family quietly in our own small town.

20130701-194955.jpg

20130701-195033.jpg

A quiet breakfast of cereal, fruit and a glass of milk. Sometimes he’s very talkative at dinner, but at breakfast he’s always quiet. Contemplating his day perhaps.

20130701-200254.jpg

Yay! He’s not wearing a diaper! He actually made it the whole day in underwear including staying dry through two naps and out for a picnic lunch in the park overlooking the ocean.

When he got up from his afternoon nap, Anthony had this waiting for him.

20130701-200518.jpg

He loved it.

20130701-200628.jpg

Our big country is only 146 years old. A tiny blip compared to others. We are thankful to be together and live in such a peaceful, beautiful part of the world. Reading Children of the World has given Anthony new insight into just how lucky we are.

A Summer Bike Ride: Physical Activity & Sensory Work

Father’s Day fell on a beautifully sunny Sunday. We decided to seek adventure (on the small obtainable scale) and went for a bike ride and a picnic at the local lake.

20130617-190738.jpg

We took our time and stopped to observe our trail view.

20130617-191044.jpg

Lush green everywhere. What can I say, we live in a rainforest.

20130617-191321.jpg

The water was too cold for even the bravest swimmers.

20130617-203946.jpg

I love the fact that nature provides all the toys necessary for basic outdoor play. Sticks become shovels/scrapers/writing tools. Leaves and stones become everything from cars to castle windows and flags.

20130617-204247.jpg

20130617-204340.jpg

Quentin mostly just used the small stones to practice his pincer grasp which now includes the movement of his thumb and finger knuckles. He also showed his sensitivity for repetition and touch sensorial experiences by picking up handfuls of sand and letting it fall back to the beach through his fingers.

It was a good reminder that we can easily add a little physical activity to our day, but more importantly we can give the boys lasting memories of family adventures without spending a gob. We brought a blanket for the beach, $5 of healthy snack food and wore layers for the weather. We already owned the bikes but we could have just walked.

I am a big believer in Montessori Materials, and their obvious and significant impact on the Absorbent Mind. However I’m also a huge advocate of the fact that the entire world of a child is sensorial. A few handfuls of sand on a beach and the right stick also do wonders.

20130617-205929.jpg